Top Ten Tuesday: Recommendations for Londonphiles

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Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke and The Bookish.

This week’s TTT theme is all to do with book recommendations and I confess to having had a bit of a brain freeze with this one; nothing really seemed to be coming to mind. I’ve plumped for the above purely because we had a day out in the big city last month and I’ve been mulling this list quietly over in my mind ever since. This week seemed like a good enough time to put it to use.

Many a moon ago I lived in London but I now only really get to experience it once or twice a year as a country-mouse day-tripper fresh off the train. It’s a strange turnaround and my feelings on the subject are mind-bogglingly complicated – I mean, really, who knew I could feel quite so many things about something so simple? – and while I never feel truly myself when I’m in London these days I’m still quite disgustingly fond of the place. In its honour here are some books that have attempted to bring the city to life:

1. Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman. Gaiman’s imagined city beneath the city feels so alive. It’s bizarre and wonderfully inventive and definitely my favourite Gaiman novel so far.

2. The End of the Affair by Graham Greene. An agonising love affair set amongst the bombed out houses of Blitz London.

3. The Children’s Book by A. S. Byatt. A multi-layered and immensely detailed novel partly set around the foundation of the Victoria & Albert Museum which will always be one of my favourite places to visit in London.

4. Our Mutual Friend by Charles Dickens. You could pick almost any Dickens’ book here but I particularly like this one. The characters that populate the dreary Thames’ shores and fancy parlours of the novel are among his best. [Review here].

5. Bridget Jones’ Diary by Helen Fielding. As a teenager this was the kind of London I imagined for my adult self; all swanky black cabs, trendy flats, office parties and handsome co-workers. Ridiculous.

6. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle. As an adult this is the kind of London I like to imagine for myself.

7. Rivers of London by Ben Aaronovitch. Ok, so I didn’t love this. But I think the idea is a great one and, like Gaiman, Aaronovitch shows that fantastical, otherworldly Londons can feel as exciting and real as the city itself. [Review here].

8. About A Boy by Nick Hornby. Or, in fact, most Nick Hornby novels.

9. Vile Bodies by Evelyn Waugh. It’s not too long since I read this so it’s still on my mind. For Waugh’s wealthy, carefree Londoners the city is a shallow whirlwind of wild parties, fleeting relationships and senseless fun. [Review here].

10. White Teeth by Zadie Smith. I think of all the fictional Londons I’ve listed this is the one that most closely resembles the ‘real’ one, if such a thing exists, or at least it most reminds me of the one I lived in as a child.

All done. I’m trying to get back into the habit of Top Ten Tuesdays as they’ve fallen by the wayside over the past few months. Next week’s is a back to school related freebie so I’m desperately trying to think of something now… We’ll see how it goes.

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