Haworth and the Bronte Parsonage

My birthday weekend was spent in the beautiful Yorkshire Dales. P organised the whole trip as a surprise, mainly, I suspect, because I’ve been banging on about how much I want to visit Haworth for years. Literally years and years. It must have been getting quite annoying. Anyway, I wasn’t planning on writing much about the trip but it was Bronte Country and this is a book blog so it only seems right to post a few photos, although I now realise that I might have to divide this into two separate posts in order to squeeze it all in.

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We got the steam train into Haworth from Oxenhope. It’s only a short journey – less than ten minutes – but it feels very Victorian and I quite liked imagining Charlotte and Ann Bronte encased in those wood panelled carriages on their way to see their publisher in London. Although they obviously wouldn’t really have taken that particular route, now that I think about it. Duh. Anyway, you can take the train through to Keighley – which we did later that afternoon – but first we got off at Haworth to do some exploring.

The Bronte Parsonage is only a five minute walk from the station and its well sign posted but up a fairly steep hill. Haworth’s cobbled streets were decked out in bunting and it was a beautifully bright day so everything looked neat and welcoming, far cleaner than they probably did a hundred and fifty years ago I imagine. It was a slow walk up the hill and we kept stopping to admire all the Bronte themed cafes, bookshops and gift shops that dot the High Street. When we finally got there we spent a lovely couple of hours in the Parsonage. I’m not going to say too much about it – you should go, that’s all you need to know – but I will say that for this Bronte fan it was ridiculously thrilling and kind of overwhelming.

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I spent a bomb in the gift shop and then we explored the neighbouring church. The current church was rebuilt in the 1870s so it isn’t the same as the one in which the Reverend Bronte preached but there is a Bronte chapel with some memorials to the family.

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We followed our trip to the church with a nice lunch sitting in the sun outside one of the cafes on the High Street. We returned to the area a couple of days later to explore the surrounding countryside but I’m going to save that part of the trip for another post, just to prevent this one from being obscenely long.

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Forgive the slightly self-indulgent holiday-snappy post. I’m a little bit in love with Haworth.

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2 thoughts on “Haworth and the Bronte Parsonage

  1. Ahhh….how I love Haworth. I have to go back. About 18 years ago I lived in Halifax and being so close used to visit often. If you paid a small yearly fee to the Bronte Society then it was free unlimited entry, and I too, spend many bombs in that gift shop. I also know what you mean about it being overwhelming, I spent a lot of time there, in the churchyard and walking on the moors, and being and feeling so close to their roots was a powerful feeling. I like where I live but being around 400 miles from the Parsonage is definitely not ideal!

    Liked by 1 person

    • It was lovely and I’m very jealous of anyone who has had chance to spend proper time there. We also spent a bit of time walking on the moors and that strangely felt even closer to the Bronte roots than their home. I’m not sure why that is!

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